Legion of Honour
The Legion of Honour, full name National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur), is the highest French order for military and civil merits, established 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte. The order is divided into five degrees of increasing distinction: Chevalier (Knight), Officier (Officer), Commandeur (Commander), Grand Officier (Grand Officer) and Grand-Croix (Grand Cross). The order's motto is Honneur et Patrie ("Honour and Fatherland") and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur next to the Musée d'Orsay, on the left bank of the River Seine in Paris.
Legion of Honour
The Legion of Honour, full name National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur), is the highest French order for military and civil merits, established 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte. The order is divided into five degrees of increasing distinction: Chevalier (Knight), Officier (Officer), Commandeur (Commander), Grand Officier (Grand Officer) and Grand-Croix (Grand Cross). The order's motto is Honneur et Patrie ("Honour and Fatherland") and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur next to the Musée d'Orsay, on the left bank of the River Seine in Paris.