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A vocabulary for annotating descriptions of vocabularies with examples and usage notes.

Version: 1.0.0

This guide is intended to facilitate the use of Darwin Core terms in the Resource Description Framework (RDF). It explains basic features of RDF and provides details of how to expose data in the form of RDF using Darwin Core terms and terms from other key vocabularies. It defines terms in the namespace http://rs.tdwg.org/dwc/iri/ which are intended for use excusively with non-literal objects.

Version: 2015-06-02

A mapping between the ISO 25964 data model and the SKOS schema. ISO 25964 is an ISO standard on thesauri.

Version: 2013-12-09

The Schema.org vocabulary, including the core vocabulary and all domain-specific layers.

Version: 9.0.0

A vocabulary for describing relationships between people.

Version: 2010-04-19

The MetaVocab vocabulary (for lack of a better name) includes the terms necessary for describing vocabularies.

We should also take a look at the RDDL work to see how we can include those definitions in this vocabulary.

Version: 1.0.0

R4R is a light-weight ontology for representing general relationships of resource for publication and reusing. It asserts that a certain reusing context occurred and determined by its two basic relations, namely, isPackagedWith and isCitedBy. The isPackagedWith relation declares the resource is ready to be reused by incorporating License and Provenance information. The Cites relation is an exceptional to isCitedBy which occurs only two related objects cite each other at the same time. Five resource objects including article, data, code, provenance and license are major class concepts to represent in this ontology.

Version: 2015-05-12

Este vocabulario se utiliza para la descripción de territorios en España (incluyendo divisiones administrativas y también otros conceptos que se utilizan normalmente pero no tienen entidad jurídica, como por ejemplo barrios). Surge de la necesidad de hacer referencia a conceptos que normalmente se utilizan para describir territorios en España, y para los que no existía ningún vocabulario suficientemente completo.

Este vocabulario está en proceso de revisión continua hasta que se consolide como un vocabulario de referencia para la descripción de territorios en el contexto nacional, por lo que sus términos pueden sufrir cambios en los próximos meses.

Es importante destacar que el objetivo de este vocabulario es el de representar unidades territoriales que van desde el país hasta la sección censal. Para llegar a mayor nivel de detalle (por ejemplo, calles, tramos de calles o inmuebles) se está trabajando en otros vocabularios que extienden este y que tratan sobre el callejero o sobre la representación de direcciones postales, entre otros.

Version: 0.5.0

The Music Ontology Specification provides main concepts and properties fo describing music (i.e. artists, albums and tracks) on the Semantic Web.

Version: 1.0.0

An ontology for publishing descriptions of historical events as Linked Data, and for mapping between other event-related vocabularies and ontologies.

Version: 2010-10-02

Lexvo.org brings information about languages, words, characters, and other human language-related entities to the Linked Data Web and Semantic Web. The Linked Data Web is a worldwide initiative to create a Web of Data that exposes the relationships between entities in our world. Lexvo.org adds a new perspective to this Web by exposing how everything in our world is connected in terms of language, e.g. by considering semantic relationships between multilingual labels (like book or New York). Lexvo not only defines global IDs (URIs) for language-related objects, but also ensures that these identifiers are dereferenceable and highly interconnected as well as externally linked to a variety of resources on the Web. Some of the main features up to date.

Version: 2013-02-09

Term definitions for singular and plural label properties.

Version: 1.0.0

Vocabulary for describing issues (or problems) and corresponding symptoms and solutions to a broad variety of contexts. It is intended to provide a generic, reusable core ontology that can be extended or specialized for use in domain-specific situations, aimed at supporting Linked Data publishing. The solutions are represented by procedures, which are possible workflows for solving corresponding issues.

Version: 1.2.0

A vocabulary for representing some concepts from the International Patent Classification (IPC) scheme. This is currently minimal.

Version: 1.0.0

A vocabulary for describing (library) holdings. The Holding Ontology deals with items and their relations to agents and documents. An item is a copy or exemplar of a document. Items are also referred to as holdings, but a holding is moreover the description of an agents inventory and access information for the item. Items may further be connected to services, locations, and chronologies.

Version: 0.1.2

GOLD is an ontology for descriptive linguistics. It gives a formalized account of the most basic categories and relations (the ‘atoms’) used in the scientific description of human language. GOLD is intended to capture the knowledge of a well-trained linguist, and can thus be viewed as an attempt to codify the general knowledge of the field. It will facilite automated reasoning over linguistic data and help establish the basic concepts through which intelligent search can be carried out. Furthermore, GOLD is meant to be compatible with the general goals of the Semantic Web.

Version: 2010

GOLD is an ontology for descriptive linguistics. It gives a formalized account of the most basic categories and relations (the ‘atoms’) used in the scientific description of human language. GOLD is intended to capture the knowledge of a well-trained linguist, and can thus be viewed as an attempt to codify the general knowledge of the field. It will facilite automated reasoning over linguistic data and help establish the basic concepts through which intelligent search can be carried out. Furthermore, GOLD is meant to be compatible with the general goals of the Semantic Web.

Version: 2009

GOLD is an ontology for descriptive linguistics. It gives a formalized account of the most basic categories and relations (the ‘atoms’) used in the scientific description of human language. GOLD is intended to capture the knowledge of a well-trained linguist, and can thus be viewed as an attempt to codify the general knowledge of the field. It will facilite automated reasoning over linguistic data and help establish the basic concepts through which intelligent search can be carried out. Furthermore, GOLD is meant to be compatible with the general goals of the Semantic Web.

Version: 2008

The Global Agricultural Concept Space (GACS) is a hub for concepts related to agriculture, in multiple languages, for use in Linked Data. GACS Core is the first of potentially many concept schemes in this larger concept space. The idea for GACS emerged out of discussions at the World Congress of IAALD, the International Association of Agricultural Information Specialists, in July 2013. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), CAB International (CABI), and the National Agricultural Library of the USA (NAL) agreed in October 2013 to explore the feasibility of developing a shared concept scheme by integrating their three thesauri: the AGROVOC Concept Scheme, the CAB Thesaurus (CABT), and NAL Thesaurus (NALT). In the GACS vision, the integration of these three thesauri was the first step towards the realization of a hub that links to and from the concept schemes beyond the initial three, and in multiple language areas.

Version: 1.0.0

FOAF is a project devoted to linking people and information using the Web. Regardless of whether information is in people's heads, in physical or digital documents, or in the form of factual data, it can be linked. FOAF integrates three kinds of network: social networks of human collaboration, friendship and association; representational networks that describe a simplified view of a cartoon universe in factual terms, and information networks that use Web-based linking to share independently published descriptions of this inter-connected world. FOAF does not compete with socially-oriented Web sites; rather it provides an approach in which different sites can tell different parts of the larger story, and by which users can retain some control over their information in a non-proprietary format.

Version: 0.1.0

The Event Ontology is developed by the Centre for Digital Music in Queen Mary, University of London. The first draft of the ontology was written in October, 2004.

This ontology is centered around the notion of event, seen here as the way by which cognitive agents classify arbitrary time/space regions, which is essentially the view expressed by Allen and Fergusson:

“[…] events are primarily linguistic or cognitive in nature. That is, the world does not really contain events. Rather, events are the way by which agents classify certain useful and relevant patterns of change. This ontology has already been proven useful in a wide range of context, due to its simplicity and usability: from talks in a conference, to description of a concert, or chords being played in a Jazz piece (when used with the Timeline ontology), festivals, etc. Relevant references are given in the reference section. Some tools to manipulate data from this ontology can be found in the motools project on Sourceforge.”

Version: 1.0.0

The BIO vocabulary contains terms useful for finding out more about people and their backgrounds and has some cross-over into genealogical information. The approach taken is to describe a person's life as a series of interconnected key events, around which other information can be woven. This vocabulary defines the event framework and supplies a set of core event types that cover many use cases, but it is expected that it will be extended in other vocabularies to suit their needs. The intention of this vocabulary is to describe biographical events of people and this intention carries through to the definitions of the properties and classes which are person-centric rather than neutral. For example the Employment event puts the person being employed as the principal agent in the event rather than the employer.

At its heart the BIO vocabulary is concerned with people, their relationships and the events in their lives. Together these can be used to build up a narrative of a person's life and their interactions with other people, organizations and the world around them. Events bound intervals of time that may be associated with particular relationships between people and groups or organisations. Many different types of life event are defined in this vocabulary including the obvious Birth, Marriage and Death but also Coronation, Performance and even Murder. These events are not intended to be fully comprehensive but are representative of the types of events associated with biographical material. Currently the relationship segment of the vocabulary is underspecified with only a generic Relationship class available. It is envisaged that many types of relationship such as families, employments and ownerships will be specified in the future.

The sequence of events and intervals build a timeline of history against which people and their relationships can be placed. The aim is to enable simple forms of genealogical reasoning such as determining whether a child was born out of wedlock or the location of a family given the fact one of their children was attending a particular school. Events are ordered in time by relating them to one another and to abstract intervals of time.

Version: 0.1.0